Creating a New Generation of Home Care Leaders with the NAHC Mentoring Program

The National Association for Home Care and Hospice (NAHC) is pleased to announce the launch of a new membership benefit, the NAHC Mentoring Program. This program seeks to pair individuals at the early and middle growth stage of their careers with current established leaders of the home care and community-based service industry for a structured mentorship with the goal of fostering involvement and growth in the NAHC Community through:

  • Networking
  • Navigating Conferences
  • Committee Engagement
  • Leadership Development
  • Advocacy Efforts

The NAHC Mentoring Program is a great new opportunity for up-and-coming industry professionals to learn how to navigate and excel in the Association and how best to use membership to benefit their career. For established industry veterans, the NAHC Mentoring Program is a great opportunity for established leaders to give back to the industry and lay a strong foundation for the next generation of home care and hospice executives.

Pairings are confidential, and distinct from any work related mentorship programs. Time commitment a few hours a quarter.

The program was developed from the success of the established HHFMA Mentoring Program.  Many former mentees give back to the program and serve as mentors to other developing leaders. Prospective Mentees will respond to a few simple questions, complete a personality assessment, and will be paired with an experienced mentor by the members of the NAHC Mentoring Task Force based on existing criteria.

The Mentoring Facilitator is a member of the organization that helps mentors and mentees to nurture their pairing.  Prospective program participants may contact the Mentoring Staff Liaison with any questions by email at mentoring@nahc.org.

  • Intended for early- and mid-career level individuals in the Home and Community based services industry.
  • Learn how to navigate and excel in the Association and how best to use membership to benefit your career
  • Opportunity for established leaders to give back to the industry and lay a strong foundation for the next generation of home care and hospice executives
  • Pairings are confidential, and distinct from any work related mentorship programs
  • Time commitment a few hours a quarter.
  • Website: www.nahc.org/mentoring
  • Questions: mentoring@nahc.org

We urge you to find out more about the NAHC Mentoring program.

Applications Now Open for PX Research Grants and Scholar Program 

The Beryl Institute’s Patient Experience Grant & Scholar Programs is now accepting applications and will continue to do so until October 28, 2021.

The Beryl Institute established the Patient Experience Grant Program in 2010 for health care professionals and expanded it in 2012 to include a complementary scholars program for doctoral students. The mission of both programs is to broaden the conversation on the value and impact of patient experience by providing grant funding for research projects and a means to disseminate this knowledge.

Now in its twelfth year, the program has supported nearly 150 research projects representing 100 health care organizations and 20 universities from the U.S., Canada and Australia.

Their grant programs award $1,000 to health care professionals and scholars conducting research in patient experience. Recipients will be announced in November.

Learn more and apply.

Home Care Training Summit on October 21

Home Care Pulse will hold the Home Care Training Summit on October 21, 2021. In this free, full-day event, Home Care Pulse’s training experts—together with other top experts we’ve gathered from around the industry—will talk about the most important topics in training and give you the knowledge you need to use it as a competitive advantage.

The conference will address topics like:

  • What’s changing in training, and what you can do to provide the best training around
  • How to use training programs to power caregiver recruitment and retention
  • How to get caregivers to embrace new training program.
  • Why training managers have one of the most important jobs in home care

Learn more about the 2021 Home Care Training Summit.

H3IT: IT Solutions for Home Care & Hospice

H3IT 2021, the Home Healthcare, Hospice, and Information Technology Conference, is the 8th annual international conference for all stakeholders interested in innovative approaches to improving quality of care and outcomes in home care. The program for this year’s online meeting includes cutting edge presentations, keynotes, and a panel.

Building upon the success of the first seven years, the conference provides an authoritative forum where evidence-based findings, information, and tools are communicated to achieve better health outcomes, quality of care, utilization of and access to care, and reduced care costs in home and hospice care settings. H3IT’s interdisciplinary and applied elements make the conference highly relevant to the patients, providers, payers, vendors, and governments.

H3IT is online this year.

Keynote speakers for H3IT 2021 are:

  • Warren P. Hebert, Jr.
    Home Care Association of Lousiana
    School of Nursing, College of Nursing and Health,
    Loyola University, New Orleans
  • Max Topaz, PhD, RN, MA
    Associate Professor
    Elizabeth Standish Gill Associate Professor of Nursing
    Columbia University School of Nursing

The program for H3IT 2021 can be found at https://h3it.org/programs/H3IT-2021-program.html.

For the past few years, H3IT has been presented as a pre-conference at the Home Care and Hospice Conference and Expo, but with the cancellation of the Conference in New Orleans this year, H3IT is on its own this year. NAHC looks forward to partnering again with H3IT in the coming years.

The conference date, Saturday, October 2, 2021, is approaching and registration is open. Please visit the conference website, https://h3it.org, and register as soon as possible, and do not hesitate to inform your colleagues who would be interested in attending the conference.

Report: Big Investment in HCBS Needed to Support Long-Term Care Needs

A new report from the Bipartisan Policy Center, Bipartisan Solutions to Improve the Availability of Long-term Care, calls for significant investment in expansion of home and community-based services (HCBS) in order to expand access to long-term care, which will become increasingly necessary in a rapidly aging society.

“For decades, policymakers have sought to improve access to long-term services and supports (LTSS) and to strengthen these services’ financing,” reads the report. “Today, about half of 65-year-olds will need LTSS at some point in their life. This need will grow as baby boomers age and require more care.”

About 14 million U.S. adults reported a need for LTSS in 2018, according to the American Association of Retired Persons.

More than 800,000 senior and disabled Americans are on waiting lists for HCBS, though most observers believe the true number is far higher than that. The average wait time for HCBS is about three years.

“The cost for facility and in-home care services has on average increased faster than the rate of inflation since 2004,” the report reads. “Long-term care providers saw significant cost increases from 2019 to 2020 as demand rose and caregiver shortages in facilities and in the community worsened. The median for the national annual cost of LTSS in 2020 ranged from $19,240 for adult day health care to $105,850 for a private room in a nursing home.”

The report contains five important recommendations for how to achieve a system of LTSS.

I. Expand Access to Home and Community-Based Services

“Congress should make HCBS available for individuals with long-term care needs who are ineligible for Medicaid,” reads the report. Services should be available through fully integrated care models, including improved fully integrated dual
eligible special needs plans (FIDE-SNPs), Programs of All-Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE), or other models approved by the secretary of HHS, and would include sliding-scale subsidies.

In addition, the report recommends that Congress develop a transitional program to support the expansion and development of integrated delivery models where they are unavailable, and should build caregiver capacity until the new HCBS program is fully implemented.

II. Address Disparities in the Delivery of HCBS

Congress should direct the secretary of HHS to collect data and issue an annual report on disparities in access to HCBS and make recommendations to Congress to address inequities.

III. Create a Caregiver Tax Credit

The report suggests Congress establish a refundable tax credit for caregivers to help with out-of-pocket costs for paid LTSS-related care.

IV.Improve the Viability of Private Long-Term Care Insurance

The authors recommend Congress standardize and simplify private long-term care insurance to achieve an appropriate balance between coverage and affordability, through “retirement long-term care insurance (LTCI).”

Furthermore, the report urges Congress to incentivize employers to offer retirement LTCI and to auto-enroll certain employees (age 45 and older with minimum retirement savings), with an opt-out like many employer-sponsored retirement savings accounts.

Congress should slso permit early penalty-free withdrawal from retirement savings accounts to pay retirement LTCI premiums and ask NAIC to modify model laws and regulations to accommodate products that convert from life insurance to long-term care, write the authors of the report.

V. Establish a Public Education Campaign for Long-Term Care

The Bipartisan Policy Center report calls for the Financial Literacy and Education Commission and partnering federal agencies to coordinate to strengthen educational resources on LTC and incorporate LTC planning into retirement
education topics.

“No single solution will address the needs of those who require LTSS,” write the report’s authors. “Improving access to these services will require a combination of public- and private-sector options, and an investment of federal resources.”

NAHC Backyard Advocacy: Share Your Story

Welcome to week 6 of NAHC’s Advocacy campaign. Congress is headed back to Washington, D.C. this week to debate some key legislation and this week as part of our summer backyard advocacy campaign we are asking to stretch your story telling muscles and share your home care story with your representatives.

Legislators, and regulators, are real life people just like you. Sharing your story can help them better understand the importance of home health care and hospice services and connects them directly with the challenges facing you as patients and families today in accessing quality care and services.

Story telling is an inherent to our human nature and one the most compelling tools we have in our advocacy arsenal. We invite you to join in on our summer advocacy efforts and to share your personal story and experience with your elected officials.

Your story can help bring issues facing the home care and hospice community to the forefront of the health care debate and be a catalyst to getting our most important legislative priorities over the finish line and passed into law.

To learn more about how to share your story visit our Resource Guide.

Helpful tips to Remember:

  1. Be authentic and tell your story from the heart — your story is very personal and should be a direct reflection of your experience. There is no one “right” way to tell your story.
  2. Keep it short and sweet. Tthe clearer and more concise you can be, the easier it is for your elected official to connect with what you are saying AND remember it later.
  3. Connect your story with the issues. Your story is uniquely yours alone, but how it connects with current legislative issues is important to help your elected official connect real-life with the bills they are contemplating to support.

Not ready to share your personal story?

That’s OK! Feel free to utilize our Legislative Action Center to support one of our key legislative priorities with just a few clicks of your mouse.

  1.  Visit the NAHC Legislative Action Center
  2. TAKE ACTION!
  3. Then, forward the link to ONE other person and ask them to do the same. 

Together, we can ensure the home care and hospice communities have the support, resources, and protections they need to care for the nation’s most vulnerable during the public health emergency and beyond!

Every Voice, Every Heart, Every Action

#HomeCareFirst #NAHCHeartbeat

Leadership Spotlight: Trauma (“I’m fine!”)

Have you ever had someone ask you “How are you doing?” You might imagine yourself often responding with the phrase, “I’m fine.” But the reality might be quite different. Lyn Ketelsen MBA, RN, a 40-year health care veteran recently led a session on The Gratitude Group  about the trauma we as leaders and providers experience in our professional lives and how we have been culturized to suppress it.

The experiences amassed throughout our time as leaders in health care become inherently part of who we are as individuals and professionals. These experiences become our “war stories,” perhaps our badges of honor. We share our stories as a way to decompress and connect with one another. Ketelsen shares that these collected career stories are representative of our skills, our fears, and even valor, for all the things we have been through. They are badges or tokens perceived as won for handling things “other people cannot.”

Some of our experiences leave lasting marks on us as leaders. Our years of travel, those clients and employees you “deal with”, challenging projects that you work on, even unexpected external variables (COVID-19). Ketelsen characterized our time as leaders as periods where we are essentially running flat out on a treadmill. Then one day, you might choose to step off the treadmill. You might take a break you might try to retire. And in that moment, “you might not know how to breath while standing still.”

Our experiences as leaders that encompass our “war stories” can be in some ways likened to trauma. She goes on to note that typically when we think of trauma in health care we race to the worst cases imaginable. But, those stories and circumstances we recall and share with such great detail and vivid emotions- we remember them because these moments are imprinted on us. They have become part of our DNA and unless recognized for the emotionally charged moments they are, can scar us.

Many of us over the last year have experienced real trauma as a result of the pandemic- the type one kind.  According to Ketelsen, it’s the secondary trauma, the kind we may not recognize we are experiencing, that is the kind that can eat away at us over time from the inside out. Type 2 can be found in people who experience trauma as a result of their job and likely to experience it repeatedly. This kind of trauma has two possible outcomes:

  1. Compassion Satisfaction: fulfillment as a result of helping others who are experiencing type one trauma- where our calling is with our patients, families, employees we serve
  2. Compassion fatigue: emotional exhaustion, suppressing our own emotions while supporting others which leads to burnout, involves work stress, reduced capacity for empathy and lack of personal fulfillment.

Ketelsen shared those personal impacts from compassion fatigue can be physical health issues, lower quality of life, social isolation. Stress and trauma can also impact development of brain, nervous system, and immune system.

However personal strength can be found in weathering this type of trauma through acknowledgment and acceptance. We can find out strength by stepping back as leaders and remembering to care for ourselves during these challenging times. Elements of strength that can help us as we try and stand strong- lend to our well-being:

Think about where you put your focus? As humans we need  and crave balance across all 5 elements of strength, but we often ignore our spiritual and emotional elements

At the end of her sessions, Ketelsen shared a quote from Nelson Mandela “Our human compassion binds us with one to the other- not in pity, but as human beings who have learned how to turn our common suffering into HOPE for the future.”

As we reflect on the last year and half,  we have all experienced unprecedented human suffering, stress, and trauma whether it be personal or professional in nature- However, it is the beauty of the human condition that we can  rally around one another and support one another as we forge a path into the future. As leaders we must remember to care for ourselves to be able to continue to care for others.

Want to hear more from Lyn Ketelsen MBA, RN or other leaders in healthcare? Visit The Gratitude Group  to access recordings and resources.

Creating a New Generation of Home Care Leaders with the NAHC Mentoring Program

The National Association for Home Care and Hospice (NAHC) is pleased to announce the launch of a new membership benefit, the NAHC Mentoring Program. This program seeks to pair individuals at the early and middle growth stage of their careers with current established leaders of the home care and community-based service industry for a structured mentorship with the goal of fostering involvement and growth in the NAHC Community through:

  • Networking
  • Navigating Conferences
  • Committee Engagement
  • Leadership Development
  • Advocacy Efforts

The NAHC Mentoring Program is a great new opportunity for up-and-coming industry professionals to learn how to navigate and excel in the Association and how best to use membership to benefit their career. For established industry veterans, the NAHC Mentoring Program is a great opportunity for established leaders to give back to the industry and lay a strong foundation for the next generation of home care and hospice executives.

Pairings are confidential, and distinct from any work related mentorship programs. Time commitment a few hours a quarter.

The program was developed from the success of the established HHFMA Mentoring Program.  Many former mentees give back to the program and serve as mentors to other developing leaders. Prospective Mentees will respond to a few simple questions, complete a personality assessment, and will be paired with an experienced mentor by the members of the NAHC Mentoring Task Force based on existing criteria.

The Mentoring Facilitator is a member of the organization that helps mentors and mentees to nurture their pairing.  Prospective program participants may contact the Mentoring Staff Liaison with any questions by email at mentoring@nahc.org.

  • Intended for early- and mid-career level individuals in the Home and Community based services industry.
  • Learn how to navigate and excel in the Association and how best to use membership to benefit your career
  • Opportunity for established leaders to give back to the industry and lay a strong foundation for the next generation of home care and hospice executives
  • Pairings are confidential, and distinct from any work related mentorship programs
  • Time commitment a few hours a quarter.
  • Website: www.nahc.org/mentoring
  • Questions: mentoring@nahc.org

We urge you to find out more about the NAHC Mentoring program.

Essential Workers of COVID Pandemic to be Inducted in Dept. of Labor’s Hall of Honor

  • New digital campaign asks people to share stories of essential workers in their lives

To recognize their sacrifices and ceaseless efforts to protect our health and keep our country moving forward amid the coronavirus pandemic, the U.S. Department of Labor announced the induction of Essential Workers of the Coronavirus Pandemic into the department’s Hall of Honor.

Through so many difficult months, frontline workers have helped to provide safety, healthcare, education, food and groceries, delivery service and many other necessities, kept our nation strong and made its recovery possible.

“Amid the pandemic, our nation’s essential workers redefined what it truly means to show up for your neighbor,” said U.S. Secretary of Labor Marty Walsh. “As a country, we have a new understanding and appreciation of the vital work and the service these people provide to us every single day. The Department of Labor will ensure that their sacrifice and commitment are never forgotten as the Essential Workers of the Coronavirus Pandemic become the newest inductees in our Hall of Honor.”

Established in 1988, the Department of Labor Hall of Honor recognizes Americans whose distinctive contributions have elevated working conditions, wages and overall quality of life for the nation’s families. The Hall of Honor exhibit includes portraits and brief biographies of a select group of inductees who include John L. Lewis, Frances Perkins, Walter Reuther, Cesar Chavez, the 9/11 Rescue Workers, Helen Keller, Bayard Rustin and Sen. Ted Kennedy. The Hall of Honor is located inside the North Plaza of the department’s Frances Perkins Building at 200 Constitution Ave NW in Washington, D.C.

In addition to their induction, the department is also inviting people across the nation to submit the names, stories and pictures of essential workers who have helped or inspired them during the pandemic.

“We can’t induct every essential worker by name, so we’re inviting everyone to tell us about workers they want to recognize,” Secretary Walsh continued. “We look forward to sharing these stories as part of our Hall of Honor induction celebration.”

Share names, photos and stories of essential workers who have helped or inspired you. The department will review submissions and incorporate them into online communications and Hall of Honor induction materials.

Vaccine Mandates: What they Mean for Home Care

  • Monday, Sep. 20, 2021
  • 2:00PM-4:00PM Eastern
  • Free to everyone
  • REGISTER NOW

The National Association for Home Care & Hospice (NAHC) will present an important new webinar, Home Care Vaccine Mandate Discussion with Industry Leaders and Legal Experts, on Monday, September 20, 2021 from 2:00PM to 4:00PM Eastern. 

Description:

COVID-19 continues to have an impact on the home care and hospice communities across the United States. Now, conversation is swirling around vaccinations. Some organizations and states have already implemented requirements for employees to be vaccinated or face weekly testing. We ask you to join NAHC and other industry leaders, as well as legal experts from Polsinelli, for an open conversation about vaccine mandates and the impact they could have and are already having on our industry.

Faculty:

  • William A. Dombi, ESQ President, NAHC
  • Angelo, Spinola, Esq., Polsinelli
  • David J. Totaro, Chief Government Affairs Officer, BAYADA Home Health Care
  • Neal Kursban, CEO Family and Nursing Care
  • Susan Ponder-Stansel, President & CEO, Alivia Care, Inc.
  • Will Vail, Esq., Polsinelli
  • Emilie R. Bartolucci, Ed.D., MPA, CPXP, Executive Director, Private Duty Home Care at NAHC

Registration Fees
Members: Free
Non-members: Free

REGISTER