Biden Administration Issues Sweeping Vaccine Rules for Health Care, Businesses

The Biden administration announced yesterday that his administration will require COVID-19 vaccinations for workers in most health care settings that receive Medicare or Medicaid reimbursement. NAHC is currently studying the administration’s announcement and we look forward to receiving more details in the very near future.

“NAHC has encouraged vaccinations throughout the pandemic. We look forward to seeing the details of the President’s Executive Order,” said NAHC President Bill Dombi in response to the news.

That said, we believe the policy will include, but is not limited to:

  • home health agencies
  • hospices
  • hospitals
  • dialysis facilities
  • ambulatory surgical settings.

According to the White House, these requirements will apply to approximately 50,000 providers and cover over 17 million health care workers, a majority of health care workers across the country. “This action will create a consistent standard across the country, while giving patients assurance of the vaccination status of those delivering care,” said the White House in a statement released Thursday.

The Administration’s plan is to include the mandate as part of the federal Medicare Conditions of Participation (CoPs). The CoPs also affect state Medicaid programs as federal requirements incorporate those standards into the conditions under which states are entitled to receive federal matching supports for a state’s Medicaid spending.

In response to a question from NAHC President Bill Dombi, the CMS told NAHC that the “staff vaccination requirement would only apply to Medicare and Medicaid-certified provider and supplier types that are regulated under the Conditions of Participation. If an entity is not regulated under the CoPs, then this requirement would not apply.”

Noncompliance with the Conditions of Participation can trigger a range of penalties including termination from Medicare and/or Medicaid, Civil Monetary Penalties as high as $20,000 per  day, suspension of Medicare and/or Medicaid payments, and the insertion of temporary management.

Notably for Medicaid home care, not all providers are subject to CoPs. Federal Medicaid standards specify CoP application only for “home health services” and “hospice” care. While states can require other home care services to be provided through entities that meet Medicare CoPs, most do not.  This means that the vaccination mandate is not likely to apply to a host of Medicaid home services such as private duty nursing, personal care services, home and community-based services (HCBS) optional services for the elderly, and section 1915 waiver programs for HCBS.

 

 

CMS is developing an Interim Final Rule with Comment Period that will be issued in October to lay out the vaccination requirements for health care providers. Nevertheless, CMS expects Medicare and Medicaid facilities to comply with the new vaccination requirements now and health care workers in covered facilities are being urged to begin vaccination without further delay. Facilities are urged to use all available resources to support employee vaccinations, including employee education and clinics, as they work to meet new federal requirements.

“There is no question that staff, across any health care setting, who remain unvaccinated pose both direct and indirect threats to patient safety and population health,” said Xavier Becerra, Secretary for Health & Human Services. “Ensuring safety and access to all patients, regardless of their entry point into the health care system, is essential.”

Additionally, the Department of Labor, through the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), will issue an Emergency Temporary Standard requiring all businesses with more than 100 employees to either mandate vaccinations for all workers or require them to take weekly COVID-19 tests.  Each violation of the OSHA standard could trigger a $14,000 penalty. The White House believes the OSHA standard will cover 80 million workers, or two-thirds of the nation’s workforce.

The announcement leaves some important questions unanswered. Such as:

  • When will Interim Final Rule and the OSHA Emergency Temporary Standard be published?
  • What will be the vaccination deadline for employees in the Interim Final Rule?
  • What vaccination exemptions will exist in the Interim Final Rule?
  • How will the vaccination exemptions be managed and monitored?
  • How will employees be counted? Full-time, FTE, all individuals regarding duration of a workday?
  • How will the mandate apply to franchise operations that individually do not have 100 employees, but exceed that number in combination?
  • Are there other ways beside the federal CoPs that the Administration can use to expand the reach of the mandate?
  • How does the mandate apply to self-directed care programs where the state or locality may be considered a joint employer?
  • What are the penalties for non-compliance outside of the $14,000 penalty referenced for an OSHA requirement?

You can expect NAHC to be in frequent contact with the administration and health care officials to obtain answers to these questions. When we receive answers, we will pass them on to NAHC members as quickly as possible. Please stay tuned to NAHC Report and other NAHC communications for updates.

The home care, home health, and hospice sectors of our health care system already suffer from severe staffing shortages and here is the very real possibility of even more significant staffing shortages should workers walk off the job rather than submit to vaccination. Shortages in staff will inevitably impact patients and patient care. This is a delicate balancing act in trying to keep patients and the workforce safe. NAHC hopes the Biden administration couples this action with efforts to help providers attract and retain more employees.

This action by the Biden administration builds on the vaccination requirement for nursing facilities recently announced by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), and will apply to:

  • nursing home staff
  • hospital staff
  • staff in other CMS-regulated settings
  • clinical staff
  • persons providing services under arrangements
  • volunteers
  • staff not involved in direct patient, resident, or client care.

Requiring Employers to Provide Paid Time Off to Get Vaccinated

OSHA is developing a rule torequire employers with more than 100 employees to provide paid time off for the time it takes for workers to get vaccinated or to recover if they suffer post-vaccination illness. This requirement will be implemented through the ETS.

New Support for Small Businesses Impacted by COVID-⁠19

Small Business Administration (SBA) will increase the maximum amount of funding a small business can borrow through the COVID Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) program, which provides long-term, low-cost loans, from $500,000 to $2 million. (An SBA analysis of current COVID EIDL borrowers who qualify for the increase shows that more than 80 percent have 25 employees or less.)

SBA will ensure that no small business has to start repaying these loans until two years after they receive the funding, so small businesses can get through the pandemic without having to worry about making payments.

Next, SBA will make it easier for small businesses with multiple locations in hard-hit sectors like restaurants, hotels, and gyms to access these loans.

SBA will offer a 30-day exclusive window of access where only small businesses seeking loans of $500,000 or less will receive awards after the new improved loan product launches.

Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) Loan Forgiveness Process

The administration’s plan is to make it easier for more than 3.5 million PPP borrowers with loans of $150,000 or less to get their loans wiped clean. Under the new streamlined approach, SBA sends a pre-completed application form to the borrower who can review, sign, and send back to SBA, which then works with the lender to complete the forgiveness process.

SBA expects more than 2.5 million additional small businesses to take advantage of this streamlined process in the months ahead, helping them avoid needless bureaucracy and avoid costly principal and interest payments on their loans.

Launching Community Navigator Program to Connect Small Businesses to Assistance

The ARP invested $100 million to establish a new SBA Community Navigator program, which will deploy trusted community partners in underserved communities to better connect business owners to federal, state, and local resources. Community Navigators will work with small business owners every step of the way to ensure that they are able to access the help that they need. Under the President’s plan, the SBA will complete the competitive review process to select Community Navigators and put them to work in underserved communities this Fall.

Access to Booster Shots

The Administration is preparing for COVID-19 vaccine boosters to start as early as the week of September 20th, subject to authorization or approval by the FDA and a recommendation from the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). Booster shots will be free and are to be made available at 80,000 locations around the country.

The National Association for Home Care & Hospice has strongly communicated to HHS how important it is that shipments of booster vaccines be sent directly to home care providers, so that safe and efficient booster vaccinations of the elderly and disabled – the most at-risk population – can take place in the home. NAHC will continue to make this case and we will keep our members up to date on this critically important topic.

Affordable and Available At-Home Tests

Walmart, Amazon, and Kroger will offer to sell rapid at-home tests at-cost for the next three months. In addition, Medicaid must cover at-home tests for free for beneficiaries, and states should ensure that any tools they use to manage at-home testing do not establish arbitrary barriers for people seeking care. The administration also plans to expand the number of retail pharmacy sites around the country where anyone can get tested for free through the HHS free testing program to 10,000 pharmacies.

The administration is also urging:

  • states to require school employees to be vaccinated;
  • schools to set up regular testing in their schools for students, teachers, and staff consistent with CDC guidance.

Getting Monoclonal Antibody Treatment to Those Who Need It

The Administration will increase the average weekly pace of shipments of free monoclonal antibody treatment to states by a further 50 percent in September. Monoclonal antibody treatments have been shown to reduce the risk of hospitalization by up to 70 percent for unvaccinated people at risk of developing severe disease. As hospital systems experience increased COVID-19 cases, many have identified monoclonal antibody treatment as a key tool to improve health outcomes, prevent hospitalizations and reduce the strain on overburdened hospitals.

Expanding the Pool of Health Care Professionals Providing Treatment by Deploying Federal Monoclonal Antibody Strike Teams

The COVID-19 Surge Response Teams have conducted in-person technical assistance and virtual trainings for physicians and health system officials to increase education and interest in administering these treatments. To ensure that more patients can access these lifesaving COVID-19 therapeutics, the Administration’s COVID-19 surge response effort will launch monoclonal antibody strike teams to deploy clinical personnel through HHS, FEMA, and DOD to help hospitals and health systems stand up the delivery of this key treatment option. HHS will also take action to amend the Public Readiness and Emergency Preparedness (PREP) Act declaration to allow more providers, including pharmacists, to administer this treatment.

This is a critical topic for our industry and our country and NAHC is heavily engaged in both studying and communicating concerns on this topic. Please stay tuned for updates.

Biden Administration Issues Sweeping Vaccine Rules for Health Care, Businesses

The Biden administration announced yesterday that his administration will require COVID-19 vaccinations for workers in most health care settings that receive Medicare or Medicaid reimbursement. NAHC is currently studying the administration’s announcement and we look forward to receiving more details in the very near future. “NAHC has encouraged vaccinations throughout the pandemic. We look forward to…

Administration Announces Plan for COVID-19 Booster Shots in Late September

The Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) announced today the Biden Administration has developed a plan to begin offering COVID-19 booster shots this fall, subject to an independent evaluation and determination of the safety and effectiveness of a third dose of the Pfizer and Moderna mRNA vaccines, and CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) issuing booster dose recommendations based on a thorough review of the evidence.

The National Association for Home Care & Hospice has strongly communicated to HHS how important it is that shipments of booster vaccines be sent directly to home care providers, so that safe and efficient booster vaccinations of the elderly and disabled – the most at-risk population – can take place in the home. NAHC will continue to make this case and we will keep our members up to date on this critically important topic.

“We look forward to working with the Administration to get vaccines to a very vulnerable group of individuals who, in many cases, are homebound and cannot otherwise secure the life-saving Covid vaccines and booster shots,” said NAHC President Bill Dombi, in response to the news.

The booster shots would begin to be offered to Americans in the week of September 20, in response to evidence that protection against the novel coronavirus COVID-19 could wane over time. The highly contagious delta variant of the virus continues to ravage parts of the country, particularly among unvaccinated persons.

“Based on our latest assessment, the current protection against severe disease, hospitalization, and death could diminish in the months ahead, especially among those who are at higher risk or were vaccinated during the earlier phases of the vaccination rollout,” read a joint statement by federal health officials on Wednesday, August 18. (You can read the entire statement at the end of this article.)

Persons will be eligible for a third dose of Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna shots eight months after they received their second dose. Additional shots are already being administered to people with compromised immune systems.

It is likely the boosters will be offered first to health care workers, people over 65, and nursing home residents, similar to the original rollout of the vaccines.

“We would also begin efforts to deliver booster shots directly to residents of long-term care facilities at that time, given the distribution of vaccines to this population early in the vaccine rollout and the continued increased risk that Covid-19 poses to them,” read the joint statement.

While the plan announced today does not include the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, it is believed booster shots will also be needed for the group that received that vaccine. Health officials are waiting for more data on the effectiveness of the J&J vaccine, which should be coming within the next few days.

It is important to note that the current vaccines continue to offer excellent protection. The vaccines provided a 95 percent protection against hospitalization before the delta variant and 92 percent protection against hospitalization during the delta variant.

Only after a thorough review of the evidence will CDC’s independent advisory committee make recommendations on the use of boosters for the public.

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), composed of medical and public health experts, develops recommendations, and provides guidance to the CDC Director on the use of vaccines for the general public.

For more information, please check the NAHC COVID-19 Vaccine and Resources page and the Coronavirus Resources page.

The full statement from Dr. Rochelle Walensky, Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); Dr. Janet Woodcock, Acting Commissioner, Food and Drug Administration (FDA); Dr. Vivek Murthy, U.S. Surgeon General; Dr. Francis Collins, Director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH); Dr. Anthony Fauci, Chief Medical Advisor to President Joe Biden and Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID); Dr. Rachel Levine, Assistant Secretary of Health; Dr. David Kessler, Chief Science Officer for the COVID-19 Response; and Dr. Marcella Nunez-Smith, Chair of the COVID-19 Health Equity Task Force, is below.

“The COVID-19 vaccines authorized in the United States continue to be remarkably effective in reducing risk of severe disease, hospitalization, and death, even against the widely circulating Delta variant. Recognizing that many vaccines are associated with a reduction in protection over time, and acknowledging that additional vaccine doses could be needed to provide long lasting protection, we have been analyzing the scientific data closely from the United States and around the world to understand how long this protection will last. The available data make very clear that protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection does begin to decrease over time following the initial vaccinations given, and in association with the dominance of the Delta variant, we are starting to see evidence of reduced protection against mild and moderate disease. Based on our latest assessment, the current protection against severe disease, hospitalization, and death could diminish in the months ahead, especially among those who are at higher risk or were vaccinated during the earlier phases of the vaccination rollout. For that reason, we conclude that a booster shot will be needed to maximize vaccine-induced protection and stay ahead of the virus.

“We have developed a plan to begin offering these booster shots this fall once FDA conducts an independent evaluation and determination of the safety and effectiveness of a third dose of the Pfizer and Moderna mRNA vaccines and CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) issues booster dose recommendations based on a thorough review of the evidence. We are prepared to offer booster shots for all Americans beginning the week of September 20 and starting 8 months after an individual’s second dose. At that time, the individuals who were fully vaccinated earliest in the vaccination rollout, including many health care providers, nursing home residents, and other seniors, will likely be eligible for a booster. We would also begin efforts to deliver booster shots directly to residents of long-term care facilities at that time, given the distribution of vaccines to this population early in the vaccine rollout and the continued increased risk that COVID-19 poses to them.

“We also anticipate booster shots will likely be needed for people who received the Johnson & Johnson (J&J) vaccine. Administration of the J&J vaccine did not begin in the U.S. until March 2021, and we expect more data on J&J in the next few weeks. With those data in hand, we will keep the public informed with a timely plan for J&J booster shots as well.

“Our top priority remains staying ahead of the virus and protecting the American people from COVID-19 with safe, effective, and long-lasting vaccines especially in the context of a constantly changing virus and epidemiologic landscape. We will continue to follow the science on a daily basis, and we are prepared to modify this plan should new data emerge that requires it.

“We also want to emphasize the ongoing urgency of vaccinating the unvaccinated in the U.S. and around the world. Nearly all the cases of severe disease, hospitalization, and death continue to occur among those not yet vaccinated at all. We will continue to ramp up efforts to increase vaccinations here at home and to ensure people have accurate information about vaccines from trusted sources. We will also continue to expand our efforts to increase the supply of vaccines for other countries, building on the more than 600 million doses we have already committed to donate globally.”

Administration Announces Plan for COVID-19 Booster Shots in Late September

NAHC: Providers of care in the home need access to COVID-19 booster vaccines Full information on the NAHC COVID-19 Vaccine and Resources page The Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) announced today the Biden Administration has developed a plan to begin offering COVID-19 booster shots this fall, subject to an independent evaluation and determination…

Democrats Introduce Legislation to Invest in HCBS, Increase Worker Pay

Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate unveiled legislation, the Better Care Better Jobs Act,  yesterday to implement the Biden administration’s goal of spending hundreds of billions of dollars on home-based care in the coming years. The legislation would give states far more money to invest in and expand home-and-community-based care programs. States…

Democrats Introduce Legislation to Invest in HCBS, Increase Worker Pay

Democrats in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate unveiled legislation, the Better Care Better Jobs Act,  yesterday to implement the Biden administration’s goal of spending hundreds of billions of dollars on home-based care in the coming years.

The legislation would give states far more money to invest in and expand home-and-community-based care programs. States would be given $100 million, by no later than one calendar year after enactment of the legislation, to create plans to expand access to Medicaid HCBS and “strengthen” the HCBS workforce.

Over 3.5 million older adults and people with disabilities are currently receiving HCBS.

The bills would “strengthen and expand access to HCBS” by expanding financial eligibility criteria for HCBS to federal limits; requiring coverage for personal care services; expanding supports for family caregivers; adopting programs that help people navigate enrollment and eligibility; expanding access to behavioral health care; improving coordination with housing, transportation, and employment supports; and developing or improving programs to allow working people with
disabilities to access HCBS.

In addition, the bills would “strengthen and expand the HCBS workforce” by addressing HCBS payment rates to promote
recruitment and retention of direct care workers; regularly updating HCBS payment rates with public input; passing rate increases through to direct care workers to increase wages; and updating and developing training opportunities for this workforce as well as family caregivers.

The legislation would permanently authorize protections against impoverishment for individuals whose spouses are receiving Medicaid HCBS and make the Money Follows the Person Rebalancing Demonstration permanent.

Under the terms of the legislation, states would become eligible for permanent increases to their Medicaid match funds of 10 percentage points, an expansion of the temporary boost provided in the American Rescue Plan. Eligibility could require states to expand HCBS access, help people utilize long-term care options, and provide additional support to family caregivers.

In addition, states would need “to promote recruitment and retention of direct care workers” by “regularly updating HCBS payment rates with public input.” The goal would be to increase compensation and training for workers to better attract and retain a stable direct care workforce.

Regular reporting by states would be required to demonstrate the legislative goals are being met. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) would receive additional funding for oversight.

The legislation is sponsored by Senators Bob Casey of Pennsylvania and Ron Wyden of Oregon, as well as Debbie Dingell of Michigan; all Democrats and all long-time friends of the home care and hospice community.

Interestingly, the same day the Better Care Better Jobs bills were introduced, President Biden and a bipartisan group of legislators announced a compromise agreement to spend almost $580 billion in new money on the country’s creaky infrastructure. That agreement did not include any funding for long-term care, though President Biden originally called for $400 billion in new spending to be part of the country’s infrastructure investment. Republicans balked at that, saying infrastructure does not include long-term care investments.

With this legislation not included in the bipartisan infrastructure agreement and extremely unlikely to attract support from enough Republicans to pass the Senate, the terms of the Better Care Better Jobs Act could be made into law through the reconciliation process. Many Democrats have signaled determination to use reconciliation to pass elements of Biden’s infrastructure agenda that are not included in the bipartisan agreement reached on Thursday, June 24.

CMS to Bolster Payments for At-Home COVID-19 Vaccinations for Medicare Beneficiaries

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) today announced an additional payment amount for administering in-home COVID-19 vaccinations to Medicare beneficiaries who have difficulty leaving their homes or are otherwise hard-to-reach.

There are approximately 1.6 million adults 65 or older who may have trouble accessing COVID-19 vaccinations because they have difficulty leaving home.

To better serve Medicare beneficiaries who have great difficulty leaving their homes or face a taxing effort getting around their communities easily to access vaccination in these settings, Medicare will pay an additional $35 per dose for COVID-19 vaccine administration in a beneficiary’s home, increasing the total payment amount for at-home vaccination from approximately $40 to approximately $75 per vaccine dose. For a two-dose vaccine, this results in a total payment of approximately $150 for the administration of both doses, or approximately $70 more than the current rate.

“This is a very positive step forward. We thank the White House and CMS for the productive discussions on vaccinating homebound patients in the past few weeks,” said NAHC President Bill Dombi, in reaction to the news. “We look forward to continuing our partnership with them in getting vaccines to a very vulnerable group of individuals who cannot otherwise secure the life-saving Covid vaccines.”

Said CMS Administrator Chiquita Brooks-Lasure: “CMS is committed to meeting the unique needs of Medicare consumers and their communities – particularly those who are home bound or who have trouble getting to a vaccination site. That’s why we’re acting today to expand the availability of the COVID-19 vaccine to people with Medicare  at home. We’re committed to taking action wherever barriers exist and bringing the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic to the door of older adults and other individuals covered by Medicare who still need protection.”

Delivering COVID-19 vaccination to access-challenged and hard-to-reach individuals poses some unique challenges, such as ensuring appropriate vaccine storage temperatures, handling, and administration. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has outlined guidance to assist vaccinators in overcoming these challenges. Today’s announcement now helps to address the financial burden associated with accommodating these complications.

The additional payment amount also accounts for the clinical time needed to monitor a beneficiary after the vaccine is administered, as well as the upfront costs associated with administering the vaccine safely and appropriately in a beneficiary’s home. The payment rate for administering each dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, as well as the additional in-home payment amount, will be geographically adjusted based on where the service is furnished.

How to Find a COVID-19 Vaccine

As today’s action demonstrates, a person’s ability to leave their home should not be an obstacle to getting the COVID-19 vaccine. As states and the federal government continue to break down barriers – like where vaccines can be administered – resources for connecting communities to vaccination options remain key. Unvaccinated individuals and those looking to assist friends and family can:

  1. Visit vaccines.gov (English) or vacunas.gov (Spanish) to search for vaccines nearby.
  2. Text GETVAX (438829) for English or VACUNA (822862) for Spanish for near-instant access to details on three vaccine sites in the local area.
  3. Call the National COVID-19 Vaccination Assistance Hotline at 1-800-232-0233 (TTY: 1-888-720-7489) for assistance in English and Spanish.

Coverage of COVID-19 Vaccines

The federal government is providing the COVID-19 vaccine free of charge or with no cost-sharing for all people living in the United States. As a condition of receiving free COVID-19 vaccines from the federal government, vaccine providers cannot charge patients any amount for administering the vaccine.

Because no patient can be billed for COVID-19 vaccinations, CMS and its partners have provided a variety of information online for providers vaccinating all Americans regardless of their insurance status:

  • Original Medicare and Medicare Advantage: Beneficiaries with Medicare pay nothing for COVID-19 vaccines or their administration, and there is no applicable copayment, coinsurance or deductible.
  • Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP):State Medicaid and CHIP agencies must cover COVID-19 vaccine administration with no cost sharing for nearly all beneficiaries during the COVID-19 public health emergency (PHE) and for over a year after it ends. For the very limited number of Medicaid beneficiaries who are not eligible for this coverage (and do not receive it through other coverage they might have), providers may submit claims for reimbursement for administering the COVID-19 vaccine to underinsured individuals through the COVID-19 Coverage Assistance Fund, administered by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), as discussed below. Under the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021 (ARP), signed by President Biden on March 11, 2021, the federal matching percentage for state Medicaid and CHIP expenditures on COVID-19 vaccine administration is currently 100% (as of April 1, 2021), and will remain 100% for more than a year after the COVID-19 PHE ends. The ARP also expands coverage of COVID-19 vaccine administration under Medicaid and CHIP to additional eligibility groups. CMS recently updated the Medicaid vaccine toolkit to reflect the enactment of the ARP at https://www.medicaid.gov/state-resource-center/downloads/covid-19-vaccine-toolkit.pdf.
  • Private Plans: The vaccine is free for people enrolled in private health plans and issuers COVID-19 vaccine and its administration is covered without cost sharing for most enrollees, and such coverage must be provided both in-network and out-of-network during the PHE. Current regulations provide that out-of-network rates must be reasonable as compared to prevailing market rates, and the rules reference using the Medicare payment rates as a potential guideline for insurance companies. In light of CMS’s increased Medicare payment rates, CMS will expect health insurance issuers and group health plans to continue to ensure their rates are reasonable when compared to prevailing market rates. Under the conditions of participation in the CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Program, providers cannot charge plan enrollees any administration fee or cost sharing, regardless of whether the COVID-19 vaccine is administered in-network or out-of-network.

The federal government is providing free access to COVID-19 vaccines for every adult living in the United States. For individuals who are underinsured, providers may submit claims for reimbursement for administering the COVID-19 vaccine through the COVID-19 Coverage Assistance Fund administered by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) after the claim to the individual’s health plan for payment has been denied or only partially paid. Information is available at https://www.hrsa.gov/covid19-coverage-assistance.

For individuals who are uninsured, providers may submit claims for reimbursement for administering the COVID-19 vaccine to individuals without insurance through the Provider Relief Fund, administered by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). Information on the COVID-19 Claims Reimbursement to Health Care Providers and Facilities for Testing, Treatment, and Vaccine Administration for the Uninsured Program is available at https://www.hrsa.gov/CovidUninsuredClaim.

More information on Medicare payment for COVID-19 vaccine administration – including a list of billing codes, payment allowances and effective dates – is available at https://www.cms.gov/medicare/covid-19/medicare-covid-19-vaccine-shot-payment.

More information regarding the CDC COVID-19 Vaccination Program Provider Requirements and how the COVID-19 vaccine is provided through that program at no cost to recipients is available at https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/covid-19/vaccination-provider-support.html.

CMS to Bolster Payments for At-Home COVID-19 Vaccinations for Medicare Beneficiaries

CMS to hold special ODF on at-home COVID-19 Vaccinations for Medicare Beneficiaries. See below for more details The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) today announced an additional payment amount for administering in-home COVID-19 vaccinations to Medicare beneficiaries who have difficulty leaving their homes or are otherwise hard-to-reach. There are approximately 1.6 million adults…

Your Feedback Needed Now! Distribution of COVID Vaccine to Homebound Patients

Please take the survey now! The home care and hospice community has an exciting opportunity to work with the White House to help establish a nationwide program to provide vaccinations to homebound patients. White House officials have asked the National Association for Home Care & Hospice (NAHC) to gather information about the extent to which…

Why Joe Biden’s Economic Plan Includes Home Health Care, Not Just Roads And Bridges

Building roads and bridges is good for the economy, pretty much everybody agrees. But helping senior citizens stay out of nursing homes? Raising pay for child care workers?

President Joe Biden says those sorts of initiatives can help, too. And he’s got a strong case.

Ever since the 2020 presidential campaign, Biden has talked about having the government spend a lot more on caregiving ― for children, older adults and disabled people. And although the proposals themselves were mostly variations on ideas like universal child care that Democrats have proposed before, Biden pointedly included them as part of his economic agenda, arguing they would create better, higher-paying jobs and unleash untapped potential for growth.

Now Biden is president, and his approach hasn’t changed. On Wednesday, he introduced the first half of what he has called his “Build Back Better” agenda. And although he proposed big new spending on traditional infrastructure projects like bridges and waterways, he also proposed a dramatic increase in federal support for “home- and community- based services.”

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