COVID-19 Public Health Emergency Extended Again

The Biden administration has renewed the Public Health Emergency (PHE) that has been in effect since January 27, 2020 due to the outbreak of the novel coronavirus COVID-19. The Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) released the following statement on January 11, 2023: As a result of the continued consequences of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)  pandemic, on…

COVID-19 Public Health Emergency Will Not End in January 2023

The Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) did not provide states and health care providers with 60-day notice of the termination of the COVID-19 Public Health Emergency (PHE) last Friday, meaning it will not end in mid-January 2023. The most recent externsion of the PHE occurred on October 13, 2022. The PHE dates from…

Public Health Emergency Extended 90 Days

The Biden administration has renewed the Public Health Emergency (PHE) that has been in effect since January 27, 2020 due to the outbreak of the novel coronavirus COVID-19. The Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) released the following statement on October 13, 2022: As a result of the continued consequences of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, on…

Public Health Emergency Extended 90 Days

The Biden administration has renewed the Public Health Emergency (PHE) that has been in effect since January 27, 2020 due to the outbreak of the novel coronavirus COVID-19.

The Department of Health & Human Services released the following statement on Friday afternoon, July 15:

As a result of the continued consequences of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)  pandemic, on this date and after consultation with public health officials as necessary, I, Xavier Becerra, Secr​etary of Health and Human Services, pursuant to the authority vested in me under section 319 of the Public Health Service Act, do hereby renew, effective July 15, 2022, the January 31, 2020, determination by former Secretary Alex M. Azar II, that he previously renewed on April 21, 2020, July 23, 2020, October 2, 2020, and January 7, 2021, and that I renewed on April 15, 2021, July 19, 2021, October 15, 2021, January 14, 2022, and April 12, 2022, that a public health emergency exists and has existed since January 27, 2020, nationwide. ​

President of the National Association for Home Care & Hospice, William A. Dombi, cheered the PHE extension.

“This is very welcome news,” said Dombi. “We hope that CMS and the Congress can reach conclusion on which waivers should be made permanent over the coming months. We have learned a lot about valuable policy reforms during the pandemic, including telehealth and avoidable administrative burdens.”

This latest renewal of the PHE will last for 90 days, at which point it will lapse or be renewed again.

This news is not a surprise, as the Biden administration had hinted that a renewal was coming.

A declaration of a PHE permits, among other things, emergency use authorization of vaccines, the access to funding to address the emergency, and deployment of military trauma care providers.

Renewing the public health emergency declaration ensures health care providers and state and territorial health departments have continued flexibility to respond to the pandemic, helping save lives. These flexibilities support efforts such as rapid patient care during emergencies, including waivers from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for certain requirements under section 1135 of the Social Security Act. Examples of such requirements include preapproval requirements and temporarily reassignment of state, territorial, tribal or local staff who typically are funded by federal grants in order to respond to the emergency.

HHS will provide states and territories with no less than 60 days’ notice prior to the termination of the public health emergency declaration for COVID-19.

Public Health Emergency Extended 90 Days

The Biden administration has renewed the Public Health Emergency (PHE) that has been in effect since January 27, 2020 due to the outbreak of the novel coronavirus COVID-19.

The Department of Health & Human Services released the following statement on Friday afternoon, July 15:

As a result of the continued consequences of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19)  pandemic, on this date and after consultation with public health officials as necessary, I, Xavier Becerra, Secr​etary of Health and Human Services, pursuant to the authority vested in me under section 319 of the Public Health Service Act, do hereby renew, effective July 15, 2022, the January 31, 2020, determination by former Secretary Alex M. Azar II, that he previously renewed on April 21, 2020, July 23, 2020, October 2, 2020, and January 7, 2021, and that I renewed on April 15, 2021, July 19, 2021, October 15, 2021, January 14, 2022, and April 12, 2022, that a public health emergency exists and has existed since January 27, 2020, nationwide. ​

President of the National Association for Home Care & Hospice, William A. Dombi, cheered the PHE extension.

“This is very welcome news,” said Dombi. “We hope that CMS and the Congress can reach conclusion on which waivers should be made permanent over the coming months. We have learned a lot about valuable policy reforms during the pandemic, including telehealth and avoidable administrative burdens.”

This latest renewal of the PHE will last for 90 days, at which point it will lapse or be renewed again.

This news is not a surprise, as the Biden administration had hinted that a renewal was coming.

A declaration of a PHE permits, among other things, emergency use authorization of vaccines, the access to funding to address the emergency, and deployment of military trauma care providers.

Renewing the public health emergency declaration ensures health care providers and state and territorial health departments have continued flexibility to respond to the pandemic, helping save lives. These flexibilities support efforts such as rapid patient care during emergencies, including waivers from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for certain requirements under section 1135 of the Social Security Act. Examples of such requirements include preapproval requirements and temporarily reassignment of state, territorial, tribal or local staff who typically are funded by federal grants in order to respond to the emergency.

HHS will provide states and territories with no less than 60 days’ notice prior to the termination of the public health emergency declaration for COVID-19.

Public Health Emergency Extended 90 Days

The Biden administration has renewed the Public Health Emergency (PHE) that has been in effect since January 27, 2020 due to the outbreak of the novel coronavirus COVID-19. The Department of Health & Human Services released the following statement on Friday afternoon, July 15: As a result of the continued consequences of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) …

Private Duty Home Care Deserves Provider Relief

The CARES Act Provider Relief Fund has been a lifesaver to thousands of health care providers across the country. Through the fund distributions, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has been able to stabilize access to care during the Public Health Emergency and help preserve the health care infrastructure for the post-pandemic future. We very much appreciate Congressional action creating the fund and the swift actions taken by HHS to prioritize the distribution of the funds.

The National Association for Home Care & Hospice strongly believes direct relief funds should be provided to personal care home care providers, and we are advocating directly to congressional leadership on this issue.

NAHC firmly believes Congress must take immediate steps to provide funds to an essential part of our health care system that, to date, has not received this crucial support. Home care companies that serve millions of Americans with vital personal health care supports, such as assistance with the administration of prescribed medications, exercise programs that maintain and improve functional capabilities, hygiene, feeding, and numerous Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) are a core part of community-based health care. These services, and the dedicated caregivers that provide them, have been uniformly recognized as essential health care providers by state and federal policymakers. However, the companies that provide this care have not received any Provider Relief Fund support since the creation of the Fund, except where those companies bill Medicare and/or Medicaid.

The companies that have been left out so far do participate in many government health programs, such as the Veterans Administration and the Administration on Aging, along with providing services funded by long term care insurance and private payment from their patients. It is estimated that they serve several million senior citizens and persons with disabilities each year, avoiding the need for high-cost institutional care. We need these companies to be operating today and tomorrow to meet the needs of our growing aged population.

Support from the Provider Relief Fund would be consistent with other distributions that have occurred so far. These include distributions to home care agencies that provide this same care through Medicaid, assisted living facilities, and behavioral health providers. Similarly, HHS has provided funding supports beyond Medicare and Medicaid providers to dentists and behavioral health providers, among others. As such, the standards and structures are in place to allow these
companies to apply for funding.

As potential legislation is drafted to provide further COVID-19 PHE relief, we request that specific PRF funding be allocated for home care providers that have not previously qualified due to their not being Medicare and/or Medicaid providers. These providers have faced the same COVID-related challenges as their Medicare and Medicaid colleagues, including workforce shortages, added expenses for personal protective equipment and cleaning supplies, and lost revenue due to added caregiver time properly performing COVID precautions and increased overtime expense.

Private duty home care providers are an essential part of allowing people to remain independent, living in their own homes, and slowing the spread of the novel coronavirus, COVID-19 and its variants.

Private duty care providers have been on the front lines of the fight against COVID-19, without the recognition and support they deserve. It is long past time to remedy that.

Private Duty Home Care Deserves Provider Relief

The CARES Act Provider Relief Fund has been a lifesaver to thousands of health care providers across the country. Through the fund distributions, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has been able to stabilize access to care during the Public Health Emergency and help preserve the health care infrastructure for the post-pandemic future.…

U.S. Renews Public Health Emergency Again

On Wednesday, April 13, Secretary of Health & Human Services (HHS) Xavier Becerra renewed the Public Health Emergency (PHE) that has been in effect since January 27, 2020 due to the outbreak of the novel coronavirus COVID-19.

As a result of the continued consequences of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, on this date and after consultation with public health officials as necessary, I, Xavier Becerra, Secretary of Health and Human Services, pursuant to the authority vested in me under section 319 of the Public Health Service Act, do hereby renew, effective April 16, 2022, the ​January 31, 2020, determination by former Secretary Alex M. Azar II… that a public health emergency exists and has existed since January 27, 2020, nationwide.

This latest renewal of the PHE will last for 90 days, at which point it will lapse or be renewed again.

This news is not a surprise, as the Biden administration had hinted for some time that a renewal was coming.

The most recent renewal of the PHE occurred on January 14, 2022.

A declaration of a PHE permits, among other things, emergency use authorization of vaccines, the access to funding to address the emergency, and deployment of military trauma care providers.

Renewing the public health emergency declaration ensures health care providers and state and territorial health departments have continued flexibility to respond to the pandemic, helping save lives. These flexibilities support efforts such as rapid patient care during emergencies, including waivers from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for certain requirements under section 1135 of the Social Security Act. Examples of such requirements include preapproval requirements and temporarily reassignment of state, territorial, tribal or local staff who typically are funded by federal grants in order to respond to the emergency.

HHS will provide states and territories with no less than 60 days’ notice prior to the termination of the public health emergency declaration for COVID-19.

U.S. Renews Public Health Emergency Again

On Wednesday, April 13, Secretary of Health & Human Services (HHS) Xavier Becerra renewed the Public Health Emergency (PHE) that has been in effect since January 27, 2020 due to the outbreak of the novel coronavirus COVID-19.

As a result of the continued consequences of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, on this date and after consultation with public health officials as necessary, I, Xavier Becerra, Secretary of Health and Human Services, pursuant to the authority vested in me under section 319 of the Public Health Service Act, do hereby renew, effective April 16, 2022, the ​January 31, 2020, determination by former Secretary Alex M. Azar II… that a public health emergency exists and has existed since January 27, 2020, nationwide.

This latest renewal of the PHE will last for 90 days, at which point it will lapse or be renewed again.

This news is not a surprise, as the Biden administration had hinted for some time that a renewal was coming.

The most recent renewal of the PHE occurred on January 14, 2022.

A declaration of a PHE permits, among other things, emergency use authorization of vaccines, the access to funding to address the emergency, and deployment of military trauma care providers.

Renewing the public health emergency declaration ensures health care providers and state and territorial health departments have continued flexibility to respond to the pandemic, helping save lives. These flexibilities support efforts such as rapid patient care during emergencies, including waivers from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for certain requirements under section 1135 of the Social Security Act. Examples of such requirements include preapproval requirements and temporarily reassignment of state, territorial, tribal or local staff who typically are funded by federal grants in order to respond to the emergency.

HHS will provide states and territories with no less than 60 days’ notice prior to the termination of the public health emergency declaration for COVID-19.